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Monthly Archives: January 2014

Maria Cristina Belluci

[vc_row el_position=”first”][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_single_image image=”5722″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][vc_column el_position=”last” width=”1/3″][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] Maria Cristina Bellucci studies the interactions between a very large variety of materials and utilises these in her work. But she is also interested in the chemical composition and unique number of atoms in each raw material as well as the ability of amber to conduct electricity and thereby link the most diverse substances in a unified chain. Reading the descriptions of her artwork can be truly confusing due to the many chemical element symbols used in place of philosophical contemplation. And suddenly it’s no surprise to find out that Bellucci studied alchemy in Florence in 2008. The result of her creative experiments is a series of necklaces of varying lengths that can be turned in the fingers like a rosary, allowing the wearer to feel the materiality of silver, amber, papier-mâché, epoxy resin, rubber and marble and also look upon them as objects that illustrate scientific formulas. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row el_position=”last”][vc_column][vc_column_text el_position=”first”] Bellucci has a degree in stage design from the Academy of Fine Arts in Rome (1989) and has studied jewellery-making technique at the San Giacomo School of Ornamental Arts. Since 1999 she has participated in group exhibitions […]

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Jurgita Erminaite-Šimkuviene

[vc_row el_position=”first”][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_single_image image=”5718″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] Jurgita Erminaitė-Šimkuvienė’s work in the “Amber in Contemporary Jewellery” is distinctive in its anti-utilitarianism, thereby revealing the essence of conceptual jewellery. Her work titled Take Away is a philosophical meditation on the theme “fast, cheap, effective”, which is one of the main slogans in today’s world, which is overrun with goods made in China. Erminaitė-Šimkuvienė found the artistic commentary in this work in the recipe for the popular Lithuanian dessert tinginys (laziness): “two packages of cookies (amber will do), 100 grams of butter (epoxy resin works well), condensed milk (sand) and five tablespoons cocoa (iron oxide). Wait until it all hardens.”   [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row el_position=”last”][vc_column][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] Erminaitė-Šimkuvienė has a Master’s degree from the Vilnius Academy of Art (2004), where she studied in the Architecture and Design Department and specialised in jewellery-making. Since 2002, she has organised several solo exhibitions in Lithuania and has participated in many group exhibitions in Europe, mostly Poland, Russia and the Baltic States. Erminaitė-Šimkuvienė has received several professional awards, including the Grand Prix in the Alatyr-2005 competition organised by the Kaliningrad Amber Museum. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Helfried Kodre

[vc_row el_position=”first”][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_single_image image=”5699″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] The artistic language of Helfried Kodré’s jewellery is recognised by its geometric articulation. He enjoys playing with volumes and the interaction between them. “The cube and the square have been symbols of ideal proportion from time immemorial. In them is reflected the idea of the universe, of permanence and perfection, of regularity and divinity. (..) Throughout the history of philosophy, basic geometric forms have represented the perfect fusion of matter and spirit and the intermingling of space and time, which was an a priori given for Kant. Since the time of Heraclitus, Aristotle and Plato, the process of abstraction has been manifest therein as the sum of man’s knowledge and experience of his ontological condition.” Gallery owner Ellen Maurer-Zilioli has commented on the system of characters in Kodré’s work in the book Helfried Kodré—Structural Design and adds that he accepts generally accepted rules, yet is not afraid to question them. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] Kodré is considered one of the pioneers of Austria’s conceptual jewellery movement. Born in Graz, he studied art history at the University of Vienna, but his meeting and eventual marriage to legendary jewellery artist Elisabeth Defner […]

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Heidemarie Herb

[vc_row el_position=”first”][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_single_image image=”5691″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][vc_column el_position=”last” width=”1/3″][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] The harmony of movement, form and colour are particularly important to Heidemarie Herb, and she strives to have each of her creations embody this interaction between these phenomena. She is inspired by the study of the relationship between the person and the world, which involves generally known but at once eternal occurrences and processes. A person’s life from birth to death, the secrets and mysteries of nature, the presence of colour, the birth of thought…. Herb enjoys awakening the senses and the mind, provoking emotions and destroying the superficiality and egocentrism that are such ingrained parts of modern-day life. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row el_position=”last”][vc_column][vc_column_text el_position=”first”] Herb received her professional jeweller qualifications in 1991 and then turned her attention to the study of gems at the German Diamond Institute. Since 2010 she has participated in group exhibitions worldwide, served on the jury at the FiloRosso International Biennial of Contemporary Jewellery in Muggia/Trieste (2012) and received the promotion award at the 3rd International Amber Workshop in Gdansk (2011). [/vc_column_text][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” interval=”3″ onclick=”link_image” images=”5692,5693,5694,5695,6486,6487,6488″ custom_links_target=”_self” el_position=”last”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Guntis Lauders

[vc_row el_position=”first”][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_single_image image=”5680″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] Guntis Lauders has always declared that he searches for inspiration in nature….in the way the water ripples in a pond, or in the play of light between a tree’s branches. This exhibition is no different, with Lauders having found inspiration for his amber jewellery from the world around him during the 2013 Song and Dance Festival. During the festival, the air in Latvia was saturated with a feeling of Latvianness, prompting in Lauders associations with “other happy Latvian things such as singing, dancing, joking songs, decorations and Latvia’s only gemstone, amber. All of these things must from time to time be taken out of the storage chests and dusted off. The words must be cleared of clichés, the songs of officiality, the amber of polish and souvenir booths. Natural, unpolished, uncomplicated amber tells its own tales—tales of singing, dancing and the enjoyment of life.” [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row el_position=”last”][vc_column][vc_column_text el_position=”first”] Lauders is one of the most exciting and extraordinary designers in Latvia. He graduated from the metal design department at Tallinn Art University in 1992 and received his Master’s degree at the Art Academy of Latvia. Since 1996 he has organised a […]

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Gigi Mariani

[vc_row el_position=”first”][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_single_image image=”5672″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] Gigi Mariani’s jewellery is like a miniature sculptural object that is able to at once “sit” on the wearer’s hand and also exhibit itself as a piece of art in the room. Mariani emphasises that in creating his work he tries to form a relationship with sculpture, moving away from the common notion of jewellery. For him, surface and texture fascinate…the coal-like dark, rough outer layer of oxidised metal is like a cast-iron setting through which gold and silver has broken through. Mariani says that just as a painter has his canvas upon which to sublimate his emotional world, so he has his jewellery, in which common feelings are spontaneously transformed. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] In the “Amber in Contemporary Jewellery” exhibition Mariani has chosen pieces that reveal the very different nature of two materials, the contrast between the coolness of metal and the warmth of amber. Mariani describes himself as a goldsmith from Modena with more than 25 years of jewellery-making experience (he opened his workshop in Modena in 1985). His conceptual jewellery is exhibited in prestigious group exhibitions worldwide as well as galleries in Rome, Luxembourg, Vienna and […]

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Fanni Vekony

[vc_row el_position=”first”][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_single_image image=”5662″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][vc_column el_position=”last” width=”1/3″][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] Fanni Vékony admits that she respects traditional craftsmanship and draws joy from simple instruments and the slowness of handmade techniques. But she is also excited by new materials and methods: “I am fascinated by the possibility of sublimating the past and future.” Her work with amber and the other materials she has chosen to use show the importance of these characteristics to her art, for example, using paper with “amber” written on it in 60 languages (ten antique, six medieval and 44 modern languages) or bases made of modern materials combined with age-old amber. “People of many nations have known about amber for centuries. I try to find these points of contact between people and centuries,” says Vékony.   [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row el_position=”last”][vc_column][vc_column_text el_position=”first”] Vékony graduated from the Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design in Budapest in 2006. Since 2008 she has exhibited her work in a number of solo exhibitions in Hungary and group exhibitions in Europe and Russia. She has received the PannonArts Design Gallery (Budapest) annual award for best jewellery for two years in a row (2011, 2012). [/vc_column_text][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” interval=”3″ onclick=”link_image” images=”5664,5665″ custom_links_target=”_self” el_position=”last”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Eve Margus-Villems

[vc_row el_position=”first”][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_single_image image=”5656″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][vc_column el_position=”last” width=”1/3″][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] Eve Margus-Villems’ Citrinitas Borealis is a kind of paraphrase of the northern lights phenomenon, in which the colour spectrum is influenced by the continuous but imperceptible presence of the moon. This work is just as changeable as the light in northern climates, and an essential characteristic of it is transformation. Light is able to transform amber into anything; it can transform amber into a berry or any other object, including the human form. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] Margus-Villems graduated from the Metal Arts Department of the Estonian Academy of Arts (1998) and currently works as a lecturer in the Academy’s Jewellery and Blacksmithing Department. Since the late 1990s she has actively exhibited her work throughout Europe. In 2000 she received the Roman Tavast annual award for young jewellery designers. Her work has been included in a variety of publications and can be found in public and private collections, including the Museum of Applied Art and Design in Tallinn and the Museum of Watch-making and Enamels in Geneva. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row el_position=”last”][vc_column][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” interval=”3″ onclick=”link_image” images=”5657,5658,5659″ custom_links_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Eva Tesarik

[vc_row el_position=”first”][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_single_image image=”5651″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][vc_column el_position=”last” width=”1/3″][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] Eva Tesarik says she is inspired by the “cabinets of curiosities” so popular in the bejewelled Renaissance era. Wealthy people of that era installed such cabinets, or rooms, for their own joy and exhibited their rarities with pride, paying no attention to grouping objects according to art, science or other fields. Tesarik’s “The Gold of the North” collection is a portable (wearable) cabinet of curiosities in which amber is paired with a great variety of materials. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row el_position=”last”][vc_column][vc_column_text el_position=”first”] Tesarik has a Doctor’s degree in biology (1985), but in the 1990s she began a career as a jewellery designer. She studied at the Wiener Goldschmiede Akademie in 1992-1995 and has actively participated in jewellery exhibitions since the mid 1990s. Her jewellery has been exhibited throughout Europe and the United States and can be found in prestigious private and public collections. [/vc_column_text][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” interval=”3″ onclick=”link_image” images=”5647,5648,5649″ custom_links_target=”_self” el_position=”last”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Claudia Steiner

[vc_row el_position=”first”][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_single_image image=”5636″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] Claudia Steiner’s philosophy is largely determined by her statement that jewellery is like miniature sculptures that provide information about their wearers. Her inspiration for the “Amber in Contemporary Jewellery” exhibition is the historical Amber Road, which began in Estonia, crossed through Latvia, Russia, Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovenia, Austria and ended in Italy. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row el_position=”last”][vc_column][vc_column_text el_position=”first”] “Each of these areas has its own form, determined by boundaries,” says Steiner, who uses precisely this characteristic as a basis for the content and form for her collection of Baltic amber jewellery. The uniqueness of each area along the Amber Road is highlighted in warm, honey-like tones in her jewellery. But she is also able to find unifying elements that act as symbols for this journey from the Baltic Sea to Southern Europe. Steiner studied at the Wiener Goldschmiede Akademie in 2003-2004. Since 2005 she has participated in a variety of jewellery exhibitions throughout Europe. [/vc_column_text][vc_gallery type=”image_grid” interval=”3″ onclick=”link_image” images=”5637,5639,5640″ custom_links_target=”_self” el_position=”last”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Andris Lauders

[vc_row el_position=”first last”] [vc_column width=”2/3″] [vc_single_image image=”5621″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”] [/vc_column] [vc_column width=”1/3″] [vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] The jewellery Andris Lauders has created for the “Amber in Contemporary Jewellery” exhibition is a conceptually multi-layered story, a story created by the symbiosis of contemporary form and content relating to the origin of amber. Lauders says, “While contemplating the amount of time it takes for pine resin to turn into amber, I began to understand that the mammoth is actually a contemporary of amber.” In Lauders’ work, unpolished amber contrasts with polished mammoth bone and matte silver, and the fishing-boat form of his jewellery calls to mind the sea, the birthplace of amber. In other pieces, a millstone reminds the wearer of the time it takes for resin to turn into amber. Lauders graduated from the metal design department at the Tallinn Art Institute (now the Estonian Academy of Arts) in 1985. He has participated in exhibitions of contemporary jewellery in the Baltic States, Russia and elsewhere in Europe. Lauders’ work can be found in private collections worldwide. In 1996 he won the main award, the Fabergé Award, at the international jewellery exhibition in St. Petersburg. [/vc_column_text] [/vc_column] [/vc_row]

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Confess – 07/2014

[vc_row el_position=”first”][vc_column][vc_column_text el_position=”first last”] CONFESS – 07/2014 foto: Karlīna Vītoliņa stils: Iveta Vecmane modele: Līga (Vacatio) radīts : Confess [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_single_image image=”5960″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_single_image image=”5959″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row el_position=”last”][vc_column][vc_single_image image=”5958″ img_size=”large” img_link_target=”_self” el_position=”first last”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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